I did NOT mean to publish this post yet, so you’ll have to bear with me while I edit it “live” as it were….

January is definitely a time for wintry reading, even if you’re in a part of the country (like me) that doesn’t see much snow. Check out these wonderful snow-y picture books–some new and some old–during your next library visit. I’ll include a link to making your own snowflakes at the end as well–a very fun, inexpensive way to enrich your reading experience.  (all images and publication info taken from goodreads)


Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Robert Frost, author
Susan Jeffers, illustrator
Dutton
1978

Frost’s poem unfurls against the backdrop of Jeffers’ marvelous illustrations. There’s a Christmas-y twist to this one, but it’s still worth reading in January. Good read aloud to all ages.

Snowflake Bentley
Jacqueline Briggs, author
Mary Azarian, illustrator
Houghton Mifflin
Caldecott Medal
1998

I have Megan to thank for my autographed copy of this gem. A picture book biography of Wilson Bentley, a key researcher into snowflakes (he first discovered that they have 6 sides and are all different). Side bars give more information than the storyline text, making this book suitable for multiple ages. Azarian’s woodcuts really make the story stand out (as evidenced by her Caldecott Medal!).

No Two Alike
Keith Baker
Simon and Schuster
2011

Two little birds–who look almost alike–marvel at how no two things are alike…even if they look almost alike. Snowflakes start them off, and they continue their explorations against a beautiful, simple winter backdrop. This is one that will delight the youngest readers! To make a six-sided snowflake, check out the author’s great tutorial.

The Snowy Day
Ezra Jack Keats
Puffin
Caldecott Medal
1962

Here’s a classic that still delights young readers/listeners 50 years later. Keats deservedly won a Caldecott for his illustrations in this simple story of a young boy exploring the night’s snowfall.

Houndsley and Catina and the Quiet Time
James Howe, author
Marie-Louise Gay, illustrator
Candlewick
2008


I’ve mentioned Houndsley and Catina before, but it’s worth a reminder here to point out this particular volume–Houndsley and Catina enjoy the softer side of winter in this wonderfully gentle book. An early reader that works for a quiet read aloud to older preschoolers as well.

Poppleton in Winter
Cynthia Rylant, author
Mark Teague, illustrator
Blue Sky Press
2001

We’re big Poppleton fans around here! Another easy reader series that’s wonderful, but this particular volume shows Poppleton in the snow as well dreaming up ways to entertain himself indoors.

Frog and Toad All Year
Arnold Lobel
HarperTrophy
1984

Since I’ve mentioned some early readers, I can’t NOT mention my FAVORITE early reader series, can I? This book covers more than just snow/winter… but it’s a great romp through each season with Frog and Toad.



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